New project: Cities in Canadian Political Development

I am pleased to a be co-investigator with Jack Lucas (University of Calgary) of a new, multi-year collaborative research project funded by the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council: Cities in Canadian Political Development. The five-year project will investigate a gap in our understanding of Canadian politics: how the country’s transformation from an agrarian society in … Continue reading New project: Cities in Canadian Political Development

New project: Canada’s Implicit Urban Policy

I am pleased to announce a new, SSHRC-funded project in partnership with Neil Bradford (Huron University College) and Alison Smith (University of Toronto) is entitled Canada’s Implicit Urban Policy. Unlike some countries that have official urban policies, Canada has multiple federal-provincial-municipal relationships that span diverse policy areas, from housing to transportation to economic development. We argue … Continue reading New project: Canada’s Implicit Urban Policy

Featured on ULI Electric Cities podcast

I recently joined host Jeremy Warson to discuss Toronto governance and politics on the Urban Land Institute’s Electric Cities podcast. Drawing on my new book, Shaping the Metropolis, I explored the potential for greater municipal autonomy, arguing that Canadian advocates of big-city charters should be careful what they wish for and be clearer about what problem they … Continue reading Featured on ULI Electric Cities podcast

May 23: Public talk about municipal autonomy in Toronto

In tandem with the launch of my new book, Shaping the Metropolis, I will be giving a talk hosted by the Toronto Public Library entitled “Who Runs Toronto? Provincial Control or More Autonomy for Toronto?” Come one, come all! Thursday, May 23, 20196:30–7:30 p.m. Runnymede branch Here’s the description: Toronto and other Canadian cities seem caught … Continue reading May 23: Public talk about municipal autonomy in Toronto

Urban populism in Toronto: Decoding Ford Nation

Populism is often viewed as a national-level phenomenon that pits a declining periphery against a cosmopolitan, economically successful metropolis. In a January 2019 paper published in the International Journal of Politics, Culture, and Society, Dan Silver, Fernando Calderón-Figueroa and reveal the potential for the emergence of populist politics within the metropolis through an analysis of Rob Ford’s 2010 campaign and mayoralty in Toronto.